Comic Review: Hi-Fi Fight Club

High School All-Girl Vigilante Fight Club? Yes, please!

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Marvel & Espionage

Marvel’s main focus has been on the superheroes. Agents of Shield does have a slight focus on the normal people but for the most part, they’ve been focused on the rise of the Inhumans. That makes sense given the Inhumans show they are developing.

Why can’t they do a larger focus on the characters that help make up the superhero teams that don’t have powers?

Marvel has a wide variety of characters who are known spies and assassins. Bobbi Morse, Black Widow, and Hawkeye (Kate and Clint) to just name a few. If you haven’t read their comics, I highly recommend checking them out. Of course then there’s our oldest spy and founder of S.H.I.E.L.D., Agent Peggy Carter.

Espionage movies are popular with the most well-known spy being none other than James Bond. He is followed closely by a host of other spy films like Kingsmen, the Bourne series, the Mission: Impossible series and the list goes on from a simple Google search.Why are we so enamored with spy films?

Some of this has to do with the blind belief that our security organizations know what they’re doing. History might dictate otherwise of course. It might also be the escapist idea that there is more happening in the world than what we know. Somewhere there’s a car chase happening through the streets of some European city because an operative has been compromised. Someone is dropping out of a helicopter onto a snow-capped mountain to break into a hidden hideout of an enemy.

It all sounds like a grand adventure.

Maybe it’s time some of the adventures are given greater depth. Superheroes and the actions they take against an enemy are at a macro level. Their world knows when there is an attack on a city or when an enemy rises from the shadows. It’s a little hard to ignore when aliens are flying down from a wormhole in the sky and turning New York City into a giant game of Galaga.

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By having a series of movies or a television show that focuses on what happens with characters like Kate Bishop, Clint Barton, Black Widow, or Bobbi Morse, then it expands the universe and shows the secret side of things. Granted, I understand that Agents of SHIELD is supposed to be just that, but they have been slowly taking that in a different direction with more and more Inhumans cropping up.

Perhaps once Inhumans comes out, they’ll take the series back to its espionage roots. If they want to do a greater foray into the espionage genre, pulling in the Hawkeyes and Black Widow would be an excellent way to do it.

Marvel has a lot happening so I can imagine they’re busy planning the different phases of the MCU.

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I’m not as well-versed in the espionage genre, but fellow writer and blogger, Katie, is. 

Ten Comics that Should Be Shows/Movies

According to Goodreads, I’ve read a lot of comics in the past eight months. It seemed like a solid time to go back through my comic loves and figure out what stories should get a chance on the big screen or a TV show.

10. LumberJanes
This is the last because it’s already being worked on for a film. I think it could easily be turned into a great show. I don’t think a movie would do the comics justice. They’ve had Supernatural run for far too many seasons, so I think it’s time to give the LumberJanes a chance to shine. The girls of LumberJanes are funny, intelligent, and not afraid to be themselves. Plus they’re super queer, and I think we need more queer people of color.

9. Spider-Gwen
Gwen Stacey deserves more than just being killed off for Peter’s growth. She’s smart, and her comic features a girl who, much like Peter Parker, ends up with powers and tries her best to be the hero the world needs. And the hero that Peter Parker aspired to be. This is a comic worth reading, and definitely, one worth getting an opportunity on the big screen.

8. Paper Girls
Everyone is fawning over Stranger Things so why not have a show that focuses on four adolescent girls that stumble upon quite the odd series of events? Less funny, and more serious, this comic is worth reading if you aren’t already.

7. Black Widow
Natasha Romanov’s story should be Marvel’s entry into the spy thriller genre. Her story is beautifully illustrated by Phil Noto and is a great way to showcase what Natasha does when she’s not with the Avengers. Plus, who wouldn’t want to know what happens in Budapest?

6. Kitty Pryde
Kitty has long been a character loved by X-Men fans, myself included. She’s been pushed to the background for the X-Men films, which is a huge shame. Kitty has held an important role in the X-Men canon, and I think that’s long been forgotten since many of her important roles have gone to Wolverine (cause they’re actually BFFs) in the movies. Maybe it is too late now to give her more on the big screen, but if Marvel wants to continue with the X-Men, she’d be a great character to give a solo film.

5. America Chavez
Ms. America Chavez recently got her own solo comic, which has been much demanded by fans of her. She’s a powerful badass who can punch holes between worlds, fly, and has super strength. Not to mention she’s an alien. And super gay. Next to Ms. Marvel, American is another character we need right now. Not to mention America’s variant covers are some of the best I’ve seen.

4. Ultimate Spider-Man
Miles Morales is a character that I love and feel should get more attention. Much like Peter, Miles is a kid that gets spidey powers and starts to save his home from the local baddies that seem to show up in New York City. He breathes fresh life into a superhero moniker that has gone stale with Peter Parker.

3. Silk
Cindy Moon aka Silk is a Korean-American who is a step out of touch with her generation. Her nickname is “Analog” by her boss. She’s not someone that initially wanted her powers, and I think that’s an important metaphor for many aspects of life. Cindy spends her time working like Peter Parker and figuring out the world ten years after she locked herself away. If you’re not reading Silk, she’s worth reading about.

2. Faith
I recently read this, shared to me by Katie. And it was excellent. Faith should get so much more attention as a character, and a superhero. She is beautiful and a character who embodies body positivity and how important it is to have not only diverse characters but also characters with diverse bodies. Not everyone has that Dorito-chip body like Chris Evans, or the classic curves of ScarJo. You need superheroes like Faith.

1. Ms. Marvel
I’m not the only one that has put Kamala Khan at the top of my list. She’s a Pakistani-American who has taught me so much about her culture. Not to mention Kamala also teaches about finding the balance between two cultures for second-generation immigrant children; and then the triumvirate, her superpowers. Kamala Khan is a character that people need to see on the screen because she would change the minds of those afraid of immigrants.

Honorable Mentions: Rocket Girl, Bitch Planet, The Wicked + The Divine, Rat Queens, Nimona.

What character would you want to see get a TV series or a movie? Let me know in the comments below!

 

Comic Review: We Can Never Go Home

I picked this up because of the cover. Anything with a cassette tape on the front to remind me of the days when that’s how I collected and listened to music will attract me. Plus, one of the vendors at Boston Comic-Con recommended it. So why not take a chance?

We Can Never Go Home by Matthew Rosenberg, Patrick Klindon, and Josh  Hood is quite the ride. Combine two teenagers, a stolen car, a mixtape, superpowers, and drugs, and you have We Can Never Go Home.

2I don’t want to give too much away.

Think of it like a dangerous road trip comic. And if you ever wanted to take a wild adventure from a small town in 1989, here’s a great way to do it. This comic covers so many genres, and music is an important aspect.

At the end of every chapter, there’s a playlist that is well worth listening to.

I enjoyed the story. It’s dark and kept me hooked from the beginning. I wanted to know how all of these details crossed and where the road trip would end up next.

The art and colors are awesome. Josh Hood did a great job capturing the script and setting the mood. All of the action is easy to follow but still, makes it feel chaotic. There are moments when the emotion-charged in the scene punches you in the gut.

I’d definitely recommend this to everyone that is following the resurgence of the 80s in pop culture right now. If you like Stranger Things, superpowers, and dangerous road trips, you should pick this up and give it a read.

Comic Review: Operation: S.I.N. – Agent Carter

Agent Peggy Carter is one of my favorite characters in the Marvel Universe. She’s a smart, formidable opponent that shouldn’t be messed with.

Her television show on ABC, Marvel’s Agent Carter showed us more about her than her movie short, or her important role in Captain America: The First Avenger. Hayley Atwell has done a phenomenal job in her role as our favorite S.S.R. Agent and S.H.I.E.L.D. Director.

Operation: S.I.N. – Agent Carter takes place in 1952 when Peggy and Howard head to Russia to figure out what a mysterious energy source is.

agentcart2015001-int3-1-18272This comic starts out with quite the bang. That’s all I want to say without giving away anymore of the story.

What I love most about this comic is another glimpse at Agent Carter and her missions. She’s not just the future Director of S.H.I.E.L.D., but also a field agent. And her field agent skills mean she won’t leave anyone on her team behind, even if she knows they aren’t completely on her team.

This comic i could be better tied to the television shows and movies. Hydra showed up again like it was some great mystery, when Peggy would have known who they were. And same with Howard. So that aspect was a little thin. It felt as though the writers didn’t pay attention to anything that happened in Captain America: The First Avenger.

I’d recommend this to anyone that just wants a quick read about Peggy and Howard off in Russia on another grand adventure. If you can ignore some glaring plot holes, snag this for a low cost comic to read another adventure that includes our favorite SSR Agent and Director of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Comic Review: She-Hulk

Jennifer Walters isn’t your average lawyer. She’s also She-Hulk, thanks to a life-saving blood transfusion from her cousin, Bruce Banner.

Now she has to balance her superhero life with representing her clients in court. And racking up more enemies than just those she beats before a judge.

In She-Hulk vol. 1: Law and Order we meet Jen at a point in her life when she feels like she’s on top of it all, and about to get a promotion. Except she doesn’t. And suddenly she finds herself quitting to start her own law office.

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Credit: Charles Soule (writer), Javier Pulido (illustrator) and Ron Wimbley (illustrator) for She-Hulk.

I didn’t know very much about Jen Walters, so this was a great comic to start off. Her leadership skills in various super teams are covered, so you get a sense of her background. You get to see her personality shine through, and that if you were ever in a legal bind, she’s the woman you’d want fighting for you.

Of the cases you do see Jen work on, she also brings up what she calls the “Blue File.” Its a case she doesn’t remember being served for, but has record of. She and a mix of heroes and villains are being prosecuted on the case. Jen can’t remember the incident, and neither can anyone else on the defense. I won’t go into any more details, but let’s just say that file needs to stay in the back of a locked file cabinet forever.

There’s a few cameos by Patsy Walker (aka Hellcat), and Jen takes a brief jaunt to visit her dear lawyer friend and Defender, Matt Murdock (aka Daredevil).

Charles Soule crafts a great story that doesn’t require all the background knowledge, making this a great comic to start with in order to get acquainted with Jen Walters.

I love Kevin Wada’s cover art, and some of the pages in between issues in volume one. They’re beautifully done, and I wish all of the art had been done in that style. But I can also understand that style would have its limitations.

Javier Pulido and Ron Wimberly both did art for the comic. The style of their art suits the comic. My only thought is that sometimes the art seems more angular than other points in the comic, which was important for several reasons I can’t reveal. So it looks like you’ll have to read it to find out.

I can definitely recommend She-Hulk vol. 1: Law and Order. This is a great introductory comic to Jennifer Walters and her fight as a lawyer and superhero. I can’t wait to continue this series and find out more about the blue file, and the other clients or cases she takes.

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Credit: Ken Wada for She-Hulk